General Information about Australia, its cultures and History

Overseas Skills Registry Connecting Overseas Skilled Workers With Victorian Employers

By |March 25th, 2014|

The Overseas Skills Registry is a new online service making it easier for overseas skilled workers who have skills in demand to connect with Victorian employers.

The registry is designed to broaden overseas skilled workers’ local networks, and support them to access job interviews and employment.

Using the registry, overseas skilled workers can create an online […]

Video – Western Australias Beautiful Landscapes

By |January 9th, 2014|

Luscious, scenic, and filled with remarkably diverse experiences.

This film which is getting a bit of air time on the TV here in Oz at the moment begins with the dramatic landscape of the Stirling Ranges, and moves through stunning South West locations including the coastal views of the Cape to Cape Walk, the cathedral roof […]

Western Australian Population Surges With Australian Visa Holders

By |November 22nd, 2013|

The population of Western Australia increased to 2.5 million people in March this year according to the latest figures from the Australian Bureau of Statistics – with over 60% of the growth due to Australian visa holders.

Western Australia is the country’s largest yet most remote state, meaning the state has relied on Australian visa holders to capitalise on its abundant natural resources in the height of the mining boom.

The state’s population has been growing steadily as both Australian and international workers have flocked to high paying positions in the state’s remote mining and construction projects, finally reaching 2.5 million people for the first time earlier on this year.

“WA’s population nudged 2.5 million people at the end of March, 2013 and grew at annual rate of 3.4% or 82,600,” said Bjorn Jarvis from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS). […]

New School Fees For Parents On 457 Visas

By |August 24th, 2013|

If you have children and are considering a move to Western Australia on a 457 Visa then I’m afraid your journey down under looks likely to be a slightly more expensive one.

Following changes flagged in the recent Western Australian budget, from January 2014 a new $4,000 fee per child per year will apply if you choose to send your children to the state’s public schools.

The Western Australia treasurer Troy Buswell said Western Australia had experienced record growth in student numbers over the past two school years, driven by a baby boom in the middle 2000s and high levels of overseas and interstate migration. […]

Schools In Australia And How To Choose The Right One

By |August 13th, 2013|

It seems like forever ago that we were choosing a school down under for our 4 year old.

I guess it was to a degree. All the way back in February 2006, we researched schools in Australia and visited what was then to become the first school our son would attend when we arrived permanently in Australia […]

Perth Most Expensive City In Australia

By |July 12th, 2013|

We’ve already written about Perths high rental prices. Now the Western Australia capital is is the spotlight again with Perth now ranking as Australia’s most expensive city and the eleventh priciest to live worldwide.

Numbeo, a website that claims to collate the world’s largest database of user-contributed data about cities and countries worldwide, now rates the West Australian capital more expensive than Darwin, Sydney, Canberra and Melbourne for consumer goods, including groceries, restaurants, transportation and utilities.

Not only that, but the list also christens Perth as the second most expensive city in the southern hemisphere behind Luanda in Angola, with the rest of the top ten taken up by cities in Switzerland and Norway – with Stavanger classed as the most expensive place to live in the world.

Australian Property Monitors’ senior economist Andrew Wilson said the data about Perth is not surprising, given the city’s rising rental market saying: […]

Darwin Best Place to Find Work In Australia

By |June 16th, 2013|

A recent report has revealed that the Northern Territory’s capital city is the best place to go for people looking for work, with more job vacancies than unemployed people.

Australia has enjoyed enviable economic stability in recent years thanks to its burgeoning construction and mining industries. While much of the prosperity has been centred in Queensland and Western Australia, the Northern Territory is now making its mark as a great destination for those looking to move to Australia.

Jobs website Adzuna, which conducted the research, said there had been 130,000 jobs advertised nationwide in the construction and finance sectors alone so far this year and while Brisbane and Sydney remained popular options for jobseekers, Darwin was quickly becoming an employment hotspot. […]

457 visa holders taking advantage of Melbourne opportunities

By |September 11th, 2012|

The unemployment rate in the state of Victoria has risen in the past year but almost 14,000 457 visa holders have still managed to find work in a variety of occupations.

The latest Australian immigration data shows almost 900 construction workers and teachers have each found work in Victoria as well as over 300 doctors, 500 chefs and 240 accountants. […]

Education in Tasmania

By |April 11th, 2012|

The eight in our series of articles covering education in australia looks at the education system in the small state of Tasmania.

The education system in Tasmania comprises two tertiary education institutions; the government run K-12 schooling system, and numerous independent private schools and colleges, most of which are controlled or sponsored by religious organisations.

Public education in Tasmania

Public education in Tasmania is managed primarily by the State Government’s Department of Education. The Department is responsible for all aspects of education in Tasmania including schooling, Adult Education, the State Library and TAFE Tasmania, a vocational tertiary institution with many campuses around the state. […]

Education in Victoria Australia

By |April 4th, 2012|

The seventh in our series of articles looking at education in Australia focuses on the Australian State of Victoria

Tiers

Pre-school in Victoria

Pre-school in Victoria is relatively unregulated and not compulsory. The first exposure many Australian children have to learn with others outside of traditional parenting is day care or a parent-run playgroup. This sort of activity is not generally considered schooling. Pre-school education is separate from primary school.

Pre-schools are usually run by local councils, community groups or private organizations. Pre-school is offered to three to five year olds. Attendance in pre-school is 93% in Victoria. The year before a child is due to attend primary school is the main year for pre-school education. This year is far more commonly attended, and usually takes the form of a few hours of activity five days a week. […]

Education In South Australia

By |March 28th, 2012|

The sixth in our series of articles looking at education in Australia focuses on the Education system in South Australia.

Primary and secondary Schooling in South Australia

On 1 January 2009, the school leaving age in South Australia was raised to 17 (having previously been 15 and then 16). Education is compulsory for all children until age 17, unless they are working or undergoing other training. The majority of students stay on to complete their South Australian Certificate of Education (SACE). […]

Education in the Northern Territory (NT)

By |March 21st, 2012|

The fifth in our series of articles looking at Education in Australia covers the Education System within the state of the Northern Territory (NT)

Primary and secondary

Northern Territory school education consists of six years of primary schooling, including one transition year, three years of middle schooling, and three years of secondary schooling.

In the beginning of 2007, the Northern Territory introduced Middle School for Years 7–9 and High School for Years 10–12. […]

10,000 new mining jobs means industry turns to Australia working visa

By |March 21st, 2012|

A new mine in Western Australia will create 10,000 jobs and place additional strain on the already gaping employment gap, meaning the $7 billion mine owned by magnate Gina Rinehart will rely on Australian working visa holders to operate.

Roy Hill, project managers for the mine, said 2,000 of the total new jobs will be ‘highly paid’ permanent positions for Australian residents, leaving the remainder open to skilled migrants entering the country on an Australian working visa.

Roy Hill applied to the government’s Enterprise Migration Agreement in December which allows large scale projects to recruit foreign skilled workers. […]

Education in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT)

By |March 14th, 2012|

The forth in our series of artices looking at Education in Australia covers the Australian Capital Territory (ACT).

Almost all educational institutions in the Australian Capital Territory are located within Canberra. The ACT public education system schooling is normally split up into Pre-School, Primary School (K-6), High School (7–10) and College (11–12) followed by studies at university or TAFE. Many private schools include years 11 and 12 and sometimes primary school as well.

Schools

In February 2004 there were 139 public and non-governmental schools in Canberra; 96 were operated by the Government and 43 were non-Government. Most suburbs are planned to include a primary school and schools are usually located near open areas for play and sports. […]

Education in New South Wales

By |March 7th, 2012|

The third in our series of articles looking at education in Australia covers education within New South Wales.

The NSW school system comprises a kindergarten to year twelve system with primary schooling up to year 6 and secondary schooling between year 7 and 12. Schooling is compulsory until age 17.

Primary and secondary schools include government and non-government schools. Government schools are further classified as comprehensive and selective schools. Non-government schools include Catholic schools, other denominational schools, and non-denominational independent schools. […]

Education in Western Australia

By |February 15th, 2012|

Following on from our overview of Education in Australia, the next article in this series focuses on Education in Western Australia.

Education in Western Australia is supervised by the Department of Education and Training (DET), which forms part of the Government of Western Australia. It follows a three-tier system, consisting of primary education (primary schools), followed by secondary education (secondary schools or secondary colleges) and tertiary education (Universities and TAFE Colleges).

Education is compulsory in Western Australia between the ages of six and seventeen. From 1 January 2008 persons in their 17th year must be in school, training, or have a job until the end of that year. […]